Bipolar and a baccalaureate

Indiana University of Pennsylvania theater major Kaitlyn P. McGilvray with her graduating class, May 9, 2015.  Photo by Andrew Milliken.

IUP senior theater major Kaitlyn McGilvray, at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania commencement ceremony, Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex, May 9. Photo by Andrew Milliken.

A Civic Project story

By Andrew Milliken

INDIANA — Kaitlyn P. McGilvray was 13 when she was diagnosed as clinically depressed.

Since then, she has seen her diagnosis change to Bipolar II Disorder (aka, manic depression), been prescribed daily anxiety medication and spent roughly the past five years in and out of enrollment at Indiana University of Pennsylvania to get a bachelor’s degree in theater.

She also has been candid about her mental illness.

“I’m very open about everything,” McGilvray, 29, said in an April 27 interview in IUP’s Orendorff Music Library. “I’m interested in ending the stigma and want to get people talking about this.”
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CrimsonConnect: SGA boondoggle?

An opinion

Kaley Toy

Kaley Toy

By Kaley Toy

On April 28, sophomore Vincent J. Lopez and freshman Tyron M. Snead were sworn in as Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Student Government Association president and vice president, respectively.

During the campaign, Lopez announced a priority if he got elected.

“One of the biggest focuses is going to be working with clubs and other organizations on campus,” he said, according to the student newspaper The Penn.

That sounds like more money for CrimsonConnect, a software system marketed as a means to facilitate connections among student groups and their campus constituents. In fall 2013, SGA paid $23,738 for CollegiateLink software, which members later renamed. The price covered a one-year license and installation.
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FADE, Faders and IUP (cont’d.)

An Opinion

Emily Weber

Emily Weber

By Emily Weber

Adam Harring’s March 25 article in The HawkEye detailing how Indiana University of Pennsylvania students used the anonymous social media app Yik Yak during this year’s IUPatty’s celebration was an excellent snapshot of how anonymous social media helps students get away with criminal activity. I actually tried out the app for the first time because of it, and I’ve been using it actively ever since.

I respectfully disagree with Mr. Harring’s characterization of the app as a “source of reproachable postings and vile language,” and I’m not convinced that “individuals at whom the offensive content is directed say they feel threatened and hurt.” (The app automatically removes content that contains names, even celebrity names, and in my frequent use of the app, I’ve found that most of the posts are inquiries about the line at Chipotle, late-night requests for hookups, and even much-needed debate about the recent backlash to police actions in Baltimore, Ferguson, and New York City.)
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To expunge ‘youthful indiscretions.’ Or not.

An opinion

Dr. David Loomis, Editor, The HawkEye

David Loomis, Editor, The HawkEye

By David Loomis

Two recent opinion pieces in The HawkEye written by Indiana University of Pennsylvania journalism student Samuel Posega [“’Faders’ darken IUP’s social-media door,” March 27; “On being public enemy No. 1,” April 16] identified by name (or by pseudonym) IUP student users of the social-media app FADE. The identifications were attributed to photos posted to the app and to correspondence between Posega and the students.

The two published opinion pieces drew large numbers of readers, including two students who asked me to strike their names from the articles. One request was couched in a veiled legal threat and the other in vague allegations of unethical journalism. Posega produced correspondence and associated evidence that refuted the allegations of unprofessional, unethical or defamatory practice.

But what of the reputations of the two students? This appears to be a growing concern among people who have engaged in what are euphemistically called “youthful indiscretions.”
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On being public enemy No. 1

An Opinion

A screenshot of an April 12 FADE post with visual and written references to the flight of stairs to the IUP Journalism Department on the top floor of Davis Hall. Commenters’ responded with ad hominem references to author Sam Posega, a journalism student.

A screenshot of an April 12 FADE post with visual and written references to the flight of stairs to the IUP Journalism Department on the top floor of Davis Hall. A commenter responded with an ad hominem obscenity directed at journalism student Sam Posega.

By Samuel Posega

INDIANA — A few weeks ago, the weekly assignment in my Opinion Writing class was a humor piece. I reached for low-hanging fruit — the social media app FADE and the stupidity of posting illegal activities on public social media.

I spent far longer grazing through the app than I feel comfortable admitting for research. But my work was deemed HawkEye-worthy and was published March 27.

Flash forward to April 10: The app’s users were put on blast and finally see my opinion piece. IUP-student Faders responded in true FADE fashion.

Student Austin Menhart posted the article, splicing words to say that I have small penis. I laughed. It’s refreshing to see young comedic talent come up with such original, quality material.

The comments on the post were mostly more juvenile name-calling. I continued to laugh. A handful didn’t like the writing. One said I didn’t do enough research. I shrugged them off.

Then I saw the death threat.

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‘Faders’ darken IUP’s social-media door

An Opinion

Screen shot of post to social medium FADE this week.

Screen shot of post this week to social medium FADE.

By Samuel Posega

Social media have done the world a lot of good. The Arab Spring uprising was organized through Twitter.

On the other hand, there’s FADE.

FADE, whose slogan is “Nothing Lasts Forever,” is a social media app focused on colleges and the college experience. Posts, which can be a photo/video and/or text, have a 24-hour lifespan, which can be altered in one-hour increments by up-or-down voting by other users.

Indiana University of Pennsylvania this week ranked ninth all-time among colleges for FADE activity, according to the app itself.

It is this brief lifespan that has brought out the IUP student body’s inner white devils, in addition to just their bodies.

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Yik Yak plays cat-mouse with cops during IUPatty’s

Screen shots of anonymous Yik Yak posts on Saturday, March 21, 2015.

Screen shot of anonymous Yik Yak posts on Saturday, March 21, 2015.

By Adam Harring

INDIANA — Yik Yak, a Twitter-like app that allows users to post messages anonymously, found a new purpose last weekend as Indiana University of Pennsylvania students took to the social medium to warn others of police movements and party busts.

The app, which displays users’ posts based on location, is often a source of reproachable postings and vile language—due in part to the anonymity. However, during the IUPatty’s weekend, it served as an early-warning system to students participating in the festivities.

Some students tuned in to the police scanner and then took to Yik Yak to post warnings to their peers both on and off the IUP campus.

One such message was posted just before 8:45 p.m. on Saturday. It alerted residents of Northern Suites: “251 Northern, police are coming for you.”

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A shovel for IUPatty’s crowd control

An unidentified South Fifth Street resident uses a shovel to shoo IUPatty’s celebrants from property near South Fifth Street and Grandview Avenue in Indiana, Pa., on Saturday, March 21, at 3:43 p.m. Photo by Casey Kelly.

An unidentified South Fifth Street resident uses a shovel to shoo IUPatty’s celebrants from property near South Fifth Street and Grandview Avenue in Indiana, Pa., on Saturday, March 21, at 3:43 p.m. Photo by Casey Kelly.

By Casey Kelly

INDIANA – At ground zero of IUPatty’s celebrations on Saturday afternoon, an annoyed resident appeared amid revelers near Grandview Avenue and South Fifth Street. He wielded a shovel and ordered green-T-shirt-clad partiers off his property.

The unidentified resident emerged from his home in the 700 block of South Fifth at 3:40 p.m. as a crowd reported to number up to 700 overflowed into his yard. As cameras video-recorded the incident, the man shoveled beer cans and liquor bottles from his yard.

The man also used the tool to shoo away the crowd, including one young man whose backpack was struck by the implement.

The crowd began chanting, “A—hole!” The man marched up a hill to a nearby Pennsylvania State Police SUV and spoke with officers who were among about 20 police in cars and on horseback in the neighborhood for much of the afternoon.

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IUP ‘expectations’: higher tuition, lower standards

Molly VanWoert

Molly VanWoert

An opinion

By Molly VanWoert

Academic expectations for acceptance at Indiana University of Pennsylvania – whose motto is, ironically, “Beyond Expectations” – have been amended in the university’s new Strategic Plan.

The latest plan, whose first draft was made public in December, advises the university to “examine alternatives to standardized test scores for admission for otherwise qualified and capable students.”

This, according to Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Timothy Moerland, means steering admissions officers away from standardized tests such as the SAT and the ACT, and focusing instead on high school GPAs.

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Whose right to know at IUP?

 

An opinion

Andrew Milliken

Andrew Milliken

By Andrew Milliken

The circumstances surrounding the death of Michael Brown at the hands of police officer Darren Wilson have been in and out of headlines both print and electronic since it occurred Aug. 9.

An issue stemming from last summer’s events in Ferguson, Mo., was police detention of journalists on grounds that were, according to journalists and photographers, infringements on the media’s responsibility to film police and the public’s right to know.

Being able to know what the police are up to is fundamental to the difference between a democracy and a police state. How else are we as a society to ensure that those who enforce the law do so fairly?

Enter Lt. Douglas Campbell, Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s head of criminal investigations and recently appointed interim director of public safety on the campus.

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